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Posts Tagged ‘aes’

Enhanced Security: AES-256 Encryption for SSL and TLS

Tuesday, December 1st, 2020

AES-256 EncryptionSSL and TLS play critical roles in securing data transmission over the internet, and AES-256 is integral in their most secure configurations. The original standard was known as Secure Sockets Layer (SSL). Although it was replaced by Transport Layer Security (TLS), many in the industry still refer to TLS by its predecessor’s acronym. While TLS can be relied on for securing information at a high level—such as US Government TOP SECRET data—improper or outdated implementations of the standard may not provide much security at all.

Variations in which cipher is used in TLS impact how secure TLS ultimately is. Some ciphers are fast but insecure, while others are slower, require a greater amount of computational resources, and can provide a higher degree of security. Weaker ciphers—such as the early export-grade ciphers—still exist, but they should no longer be used.

The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), is an encryption specification that succeeded the Data Encryption Standard (DES). AES was standardized in 2001 after a 5 year review, and is currently one of the most popular algorithms used in symmetric-key cryptography. It is often seen as the gold standard symmetric-key encryption technique, with many security-conscious organizations requiring their employees to use AES-256 for all communications. It is also used prominently in TLS.

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How Secure are Password-Protected Files?

Saturday, February 14th, 2009

We recently discussed email security for accountants and mentioned that the use of password-protected files is not usually a very good solution for meeting data privacy needs.  After writing this and getting some feed back, we thought that the issue of password-protected files really deserves some further discussion.  Many people are under the assumption that if they use the “password protection” features of whatever software they are using, that their data is safe and secure.  However, this is not necessarily the case.  Why?

Using password-protected files to secure data is fast and easy and built into many applications.  Why not use it?  Certainly, password protecting files is much better than not doing so.  However, there are several things that determine how secure these “protected” files really are.

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Wireless WPA Security Already Cracking — Be Sure to use SSL!

Monday, November 10th, 2008

Security researches will be outlining attacks that can break the WPA wirless security protection of wireless networks this week at the PacSec conference in Tokyo.  Erik Tews and Martin Beck will discuss how networks protected by TKIP (Temporal Key Integrity Protocol — originally called WEP2) are vulnerable to attackers being able to inject small amounts of traffic into the encrypted data stream.  This can allow attackers to:

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