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Posts Tagged ‘pgp’

Enhanced Security: AES-256 Encryption for SSL and TLS

Tuesday, December 1st, 2020

AES-256 EncryptionSSL and TLS play critical roles in securing data transmission over the internet, and AES-256 is integral in their most secure configurations. The original standard was known as Secure Sockets Layer (SSL). Although it was replaced by Transport Layer Security (TLS), many in the industry still refer to TLS by its predecessor’s acronym. While TLS can be relied on for securing information at a high level—such as US Government TOP SECRET data—improper or outdated implementations of the standard may not provide much security at all.

Variations in which cipher is used in TLS impact how secure TLS ultimately is. Some ciphers are fast but insecure, while others are slower, require a greater amount of computational resources, and can provide a higher degree of security. Weaker ciphers—such as the early export-grade ciphers—still exist, but they should no longer be used.

The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), is an encryption specification that succeeded the Data Encryption Standard (DES). AES was standardized in 2001 after a 5 year review, and is currently one of the most popular algorithms used in symmetric-key cryptography. It is often seen as the gold standard symmetric-key encryption technique, with many security-conscious organizations requiring their employees to use AES-256 for all communications. It is also used prominently in TLS.

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Creating Secure Web Pages and Forms: What You Need to Know

Monday, September 25th, 2017

Fred is a busy small business CEO.  He hired a cheap developer online to setup his secure medical web site for him.  The developer got an SSL certificate and setup pages where patients can make appointments and the doctor can receive patient requests and notices, “securely”.  However, the developer didn’t have any real training in security, none in HIPAA, and as a result, PHI was being sent in the clear, there were no audit trails or logs, SSL security was not enforced, and may other serious issues plagued the site.  The worst part — No one knew.

Luckily, Fred was made aware of the situation before a serious security breach happened (that he knew of); however, he had to re-do the site from scratch, more than doubling his time and money costs.

Creating a web site that has “secure” components requires more than slapping together some web pages and adding an SSL Certificate.  All such a certificate really does is create a thin veneer of security — one that does not go very far to protect whatever sensitive data necessitated security in the first place.  In fact, naive attempts at security can ultimately make the data less secure and more likely to be compromised by creating an appetizing target for the unscrupulous.

So, beyond paying big bucks to hire a developer with significant security expertise, what do you do? Start with this article — its purpose is to shed light on many of the most significant factors in secure web site programming/design and what you can do to address them.  At a minimum, reading this article will help you to intelligently discuss your web site security with the developers that you ultimately hire.

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Email Encryption Showdown: SMTP TLS vs PGP vs S/MIME vs Portal Pickup

Monday, May 29th, 2017

While messaging apps may have become more popular over the last ten or so years, email remains an important method of communication, particularly for business. Despite its common use, there are many security problems associated with regular email:

Message Tampering

False messages are a significant threat, particularly when it comes to business and legal issues. Imagine someone else sends an email from your account – how can you prove it wasn’t you? There are many viruses that spread in this way, and with regular email, there is no concrete way to tell whether a message is false or not.

Email Encryption

Normal emails can also be modified by anyone with system-administrator access to the SMTP servers that your emails pass through. They can alter or completely delete the message, and your recipient has no way of knowing if the message has been tampered with or not.

In the same way, messages can be saved by the SMTP system administrator, then altered and sent again at a later time. This means that subsequent messages may appear valid, even if they are actually just copies that have been faked.

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Self-Addressed Spoofed Email: How to Shut Down Spam

Thursday, May 11th, 2017

Spam messages coming from… your own email? This may sound like a cheesy movie plot, but this form of spam, known as “spoofing,” can have horrifying consequences if they result in compromised security, stolen data, or malware on your company’s machines. Read on to find out how to snuff out spoofing and help everyone avoid these attacks in the future.

Forged Email

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Next Generation Data Loss Prevention (DLP) with LuxSci Secure Email

Tuesday, September 29th, 2015

Data Loss Prevention (DLP) describes a plan for companies to control the sending of sensitive data.  E.g. this can include controls to stop the flow of sensitive data or to ensure that sensitive data is always well-encrypted (for compliance) when sent.

In the context of email, DLP is usually achieved through the following formula:

  1. Construct a list of words, phrases, or patterns that, if they are present in an email, signify an email message that may contain sensitive information.
  2. Have all outbound email scanned for these words, phrases, or patterns
  3. For messages that match, take action:
    1. Block: Refuse to send the message, or
    2. Encrypt: Ensure that the message is encrypted
    3. Audit: (and maybe send a copy of the message to an “auditor”)

This classic DLP system is available through many email providers and has been available at LuxSci for many years as well. However, it does have a glaring limitation — no matter how complete and complex your DLP pattern list is, it is almost certain that some messages containing sensitive information will not quite match (or the information will be embedded in attachments that can’t be searched properly).  If they do not match, then they will escape in a way that may be considered a breach.

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