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Posts Tagged ‘beast’

Enhanced Security: AES-256 Encryption for SSL and TLS

Tuesday, December 1st, 2020

AES-256 EncryptionSSL and TLS play critical roles in securing data transmission over the internet, and AES-256 is integral in their most secure configurations. The original standard was known as Secure Sockets Layer (SSL). Although it was replaced by Transport Layer Security (TLS), many in the industry still refer to TLS by its predecessor’s acronym. While TLS can be relied on for securing information at a high level—such as US Government TOP SECRET data—improper or outdated implementations of the standard may not provide much security at all.

Variations in which cipher is used in TLS impact how secure TLS ultimately is. Some ciphers are fast but insecure, while others are slower, require a greater amount of computational resources, and can provide a higher degree of security. Weaker ciphers—such as the early export-grade ciphers—still exist, but they should no longer be used.

The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), is an encryption specification that succeeded the Data Encryption Standard (DES). AES was standardized in 2001 after a 5 year review, and is currently one of the most popular algorithms used in symmetric-key cryptography. It is often seen as the gold standard symmetric-key encryption technique, with many security-conscious organizations requiring their employees to use AES-256 for all communications. It is also used prominently in TLS.

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SSL versus TLS – What’s the difference?

Saturday, May 12th, 2018

SSL versus TLS

TLS (Transport Layer Security) and SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) are protocols that provide data encryption and authentication between applications and servers in scenarios where that data is being sent across an insecure network, such as checking your email (How does the Secure Socket Layer work?). The terms SSL and TLS are often used interchangeably or in conjunction with each other (TLS/SSL), but one is in fact the predecessor of the other — SSL 3.0 served as the basis for TLS 1.0 which, as a result, is sometimes referred to as SSL 3.1. With this said though, is there actually a practical difference between the two?

SSL versus TLS: What is the differenc?

See also our Infographic which summarizes these differences.

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Is SSL/TLS Really Broken by the BEAST attack? What is the Real Story? What Should I Do?

Wednesday, September 21st, 2011

Update – January, 2015.  SSL v3 should be turned off.  RC4 is now weak and should not be used anymore, even as a work around to the BEAST attack.  LuxSci recommends to use TLS v1.1+ and NIST-recommended ciphers.  The BEAST is not really considered a significant vector (even with TLS v1.0) compared to other things, anymore.

Update – April, 2012. openssl v1.0.1 is out and it supports TLS v1.1 and v1.2 which help mitigate this attack.  All web sites hosted by LuxSci now use this updated software and are safe from BEAST.  LuxSci recommends using a web host which supports TLS v1.1 and v1.2 for secure web connections.

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SSL v3 and TLS v1 are subject to a serious exploit, according to a recently published attack mechanism (called BEAST).  This sounds foundation-shattering and kind of scary. When people see this, as when we did, the first panicky questions that arise are:

  • What is really affected?
  • How serious is it?
  • What can I do to protect myself?
  • How does the BEAST attack actually work?

After researching this issue, we have digested what we have found and produced this article to answer all of these questions for you.

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