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Posts Tagged ‘email’

What exactly is ePHI? Who has to worry about it? Where can it be safely located?

Friday, September 15th, 2017

There is often a great deal of confusion and misinformation about what, exactly, constitutes ePHI (electronic protected health information) which must be protected due to HIPAA requirements.  Even once you have a grasp of ePHI and how it applies to you, the next question becomes … where can I put ePHI and where not?  What is secure and what is not?

We will answer the “what is ePHI” question in general, and the “where can I put it” question in the context of web and email hosting, and SecureForm processing at LuxSci.

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DMARC: The State of Domain-based Email Authentication – Part 2

Monday, September 11th, 2017

Building a safer email ecosystem with DMARC

In our previous post, we described two techniques for authenticating an email sender:

  • Sender Policy Framework (SPF), IETF RFC 7208, which verifies if the sending MTA is indeed authorized to send mail on behalf of a domain; and
  • DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM), IETF RFC 6376, where a domain shows “ownership” of a mail it sends by signing portions of it so that critical aspects cannot be forged by intermediaries.

Like most technologies, these are just individual weapons in the arsenal for fighting phishing and spam. Weapons, like all tools, need to be properly used if they are to be effective. Unfortunately, as we described in the earlier post, both SPF and DKIM are deployed in a manner that reduces their usefulness. With SPF, the validation policy set by the sender is often chosen in a manner that leaves handling authentication failures at the discretion of the recipient. DKIM, on the other hand, does not even have an explicit policy directive set by the sender. Moreover, in a heterogeneous mail environment, some perfectly legitimate MTAs might not be capable of signing messages.

Building a safer email system with DMARC

Thus, receivers in actual deployments tend to “soft fail” any SPF and/or DKIM validation failures as there are reasonable situations when legitimate mail can fail such checks. A common example is forwarded mail (which fails SPF), or mail sent via a mailing list (which fails DKIM). Mail providers consider it better to deliver most mail (even if some are fake or spammy) rather than risk dropping legitimate mail. Thus, neither of these techniques individually or combined provide clear guidance to receivers, and the resulting actions can be inconsistent.

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Is email message transport over MAPI or HTTPS secure?

Tuesday, September 5th, 2017

Our latest “Ask Erik” question involves understanding what email headers save about secure message transport … especially when they list MAPI or HTTPS instead of TLS.

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HIPAA Compliance and Emails: A View from the Trenches

Monday, August 28th, 2017

We have scoured the internet for real-life examples on the use of emails in medical scenarios, the better to be able to convince our readers of the points we have made in past posts about the perils and pitfalls of using unsecured emails for communications. Email is one of the oldest (some even refer to it as “legacy”) tools in our always-connected, digital world. However, its use between patients and their medical providers and amongst doctors and their business associates can be fraught with issues that may violate the provisions of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).

The HIPAA privacy rules require covered entities and their business associates to protect patients’ health information from unauthorized disclosure. The HIPAA security rules do not mandate specific technologies or prohibit others. In fact, HIPAA

“…allows covered health care providers to communicate electronically, such as through e-mail, with their patients, provided they apply reasonable safeguards when doing so.

An imperfect understanding of patients’ privacy concerns, lack of proficiency in using computers or access to them, misguided policies on usage – all these play a part in HIPAA privacy breaches. The consequences of such breaches can be quite burdensome for the medical provider.

HIPAA-compliant email

In a previous post, we provided some data on HIPAA-related complaints filed with the US Health and Human Services’ (HHS) Office of Civil Rights (OCR). There were 350 breaches of unprotected health information involving 500 or more individuals reported in the last two years to the HHS and under investigation by OCR. 75 of these had their origin in email, with half this number involved in unauthorized access or disclosure.

Medical providers often forget (or might even be unaware of) “reasonable safeguardsthat can easily be implemented to prevent emails from leaking information that patients might consider as compromising their privacy. By analyzing some real life examples of how email is used (well, actually misused) in practice, we hope this post can convince you of reasonable safeguards that can make email a useful and efficient part of your workflow while conforming to HIPAA.

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Do you expect email carriers to require TLS v1.2 or better in the future?

Friday, July 28th, 2017

Our latest “Ask Erik” question involves the future of TLS delivery:.

Hello Erik,

I am aware of an e-mail server of a Carrier refuses any TLS connections that are not using TLS v1.2. Is it reasonable to expect more Carriers to follow this tact in the future?

Thank you.

This question involves the use of “TLS” to transparently encrypt email communications between email servers over the SMTP protocol.  For a little background, see: “All about secure email delivery over TLS“.

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Email Delivery: How do you know if they got your message?

Monday, July 17th, 2017

You just sent an important business communication via email and assume all is well … but what if that email was not received?

How do you know if they got your email message?

How do you know?  There could be significant delays or consequences if the message was not delivered.  What can you do to put your mind at ease?

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Opt-In Email Encryption is Too Risky for HIPAA Compliance

Tuesday, July 11th, 2017

A majority of companies and hospitals that offer email encryption for HIPAA compliance allow senders to “opt in” to encryption on a message-by-message basis.  E.g., if the sender “does nothing special” then the email will be sent in the normal/insecure manner of email in general.  If the sender explicitly checks a box or adds some special content to the body or subject of the message, then it will be encrypted and HIPAA compliant.

Opt-in encryption is desirable because it is “easy” … end users don’t want any extra work and don’t want encryption requirements to bog them down, especially if many of their messages do not contain PHI.  It is “good for usability” and thus easy to sell.

Cybersecurity opt-in email encryption

However, opt-in encryption is a very bad idea with the inception of the HIPAA Omnibus rule.  Opt-in encryption imposes a large amount of risk on an organization, which grows exponentially with the size of the organization.  Organizations are responsible for the mistakes and lapses of their employees; providing an encryption system where inattention can lead to a breach is something to be very wary of.

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How can I determine if an email was actually sent to me?

Wednesday, June 14th, 2017

Someone claims to have sent you an email message.  You never got it, as far as you know.  How can you determine if the sender actually sent the message?  How to you prove or disprove the claim?

This question is submitted by a reader via “Ask Erik” — a channel by which anyone can ask LuxSci a technical question.

Email

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Self-Addressed Spoofed Email: How to Shut Down Spam

Thursday, May 11th, 2017

Spam messages coming from… your own email? This may sound like a cheesy movie plot, but this form of spam, known as “spoofing,” can have horrifying consequences if they result in compromised security, stolen data, or malware on your company’s machines. Read on to find out how to snuff out spoofing and help everyone avoid these attacks in the future.

Forged Email

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How do I send HIPAA-compliant lab results via email?

Friday, May 5th, 2017

A question about HIPAA-compliant transactional email from Ask Erik:

As a non-technical member of the founding team of a Health Care Startup I have a question about HIPAA-compliant email as we begin to send out lab test results to individuals and the health care providers we partner with:

“Does one dedicated email address for results distribution that is HIPAA-compliant and secure make us in compliance. ”

We have team members who communicate with our DDS clinics but they don’t distribute test results. Only I will do that through a dedicated email address.   What do we have to do to be compliant from day one of distributing test results as part of our service to our customers (primarily dentists and oral surgeons)?

I was told by the service provider of our website and email hosting services that if we made the one email address a Business Premium account using the Microsoft Secure Server, that all the other regular email addresses would be covered as well. Is this true?

Thank you for the forum to ask real life scenario questions.

Lab results to email

Hello,

There are many aspects to your question.  Lets address each one in turn:

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