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Posts Tagged ‘secureline’

Are you Minimizing your Risk by using the Next Generation of Opt In Email Encryption?

Friday, September 11th, 2015

We have long held that leaving it to each sender/employee to properly enable encryption for each sensitive message (a.k.a “Opt In Encryption”) is too risky.  Why? Any mistake or oversight immediately equals a breach and liability.

Instead, LuxSci has always promoted use of “Opt Out Encryption,” in which the account default is to encrypt everything unless the sender specifically indicates that the message is not sensitive.  The risk with Opt Out Encryption is very much smaller than with Opt In.  (See Opt-In Email Encryption is too Risky for HIPAA Compliance).

The problem is: many companies use Opt In Encryption because it is convenient when sending messages without sensitive information — you just send these messages “as usual,”  without forethought.  These companies are trading large risks in return for conveniences.

LuxSci has solved the “Opt In vs. Opt Out” conundrum with its SecureLine Email Encryption Service.  You could say that SecureLine enables the “Next Generation” of Opt In Email Encryption — combining both usability and security.

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Is your Accountant protecting your privacy and identity?

Wednesday, April 15th, 2015

Everyone always harps on the necessity of privacy when discussing health care, government, and banking communications.  It is surprising how little attention is paid to email security with regards to accounting and tax preparation.   There is a real danger of identity theft, unintended information disclosure, as well as invasion of privacy when using tax preparation services or organizations that do not use secure email.  Why is this?

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LuxSci’s New WebMail Composer FAQs — How do I …?

Wednesday, July 9th, 2014

To learn about the new WebMail Composer and our ongoing plans for enhancing the LuxSci web interface, see The Beginning of the New Luxsci Interface.  In this document, we answer common questions about the new composer; in particular, shedding light on things that are different to help acquaint you with the changes.

What does Composer look like?

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Web Form Signatures: Fast, Easy Method of Informed Consent

Friday, August 23rd, 2013

A dentist looking for a consult on x-rays needs explicit consent from the patient to transfer the x-rays and related information [securely] to the other doctor, at least in many states.

There are many similar cases where “written” consent is needed to transfer private information, transfer responsibility, request actions, etc. Simply sending information over email or through a web form does not include a mechanism for transferring consent — e.g., written authorization signatures.

Fortunately, there is a simple, cost-effective, and secure solution — use of web-based forms, which include written signature field(s).

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How do you know if someone has read your email message?

Friday, July 26th, 2013

Has your recipient actually read that email that you sent to him or her?

Has anyone else been reading the email messages that you sent or which are saved in your online email folders?

We are often asked how customers can verify if an email that has been sent has actually been read or if they can detect if messages have been covertly read (e.g. by the NSA).  The quick answer is that:

  1. With respect to your recipients reading your emails, you generally cannot ever know unless you plan on it ahead of time or use a system that includes read tracking as a feature.
  2. With respect to your ISP or the government reading emails, you cannot ever know.  All you can do is implement encrptions mechanisms to prevent them from reading the messages altogether.

In this article, we will discuss what measures you can take and how effective they are for determining if an email message has been read — the simplest and most generally available methods are the least reliable.

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