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Posts Tagged ‘encrypted email’

HIPAA Email: Does it Require Encryption?

Tuesday, July 31st, 2018

HIPAA’s encryption requirements fall in a grey area. This is mainly due to two reasons:

  • encryption is required when ‘deemed appropriate’, which means email encryption is not absolutely necessary and ‘mutual consent’ can be used in place of encryption.
  • there are a number of ‘addressable requirements’ pertaining to the technical safeguards as far as ePHI encryption is concerned

What exactly is mutual consent?

Mutual consent refers to a mutual understanding between doctor and patient that email containing ePHI can be sent to patients’ email account without encryption. Patients should communicate their approval in writing after being informed of the security risks and understanding that a secure option is available. You must additionally maintain all records of mutual consent.

HIPAA Email Encryption

Mutual consent does not waive off other HIPAA-related requirements. You must still use HIPAA complaint systems, log and audit non-encryption choices, and back-up and archive all email communications sent insecurely, etc.

Encryption at rest is ‘addressable’

‘Addressable’ means that the safeguard should be implemented or an alternative to the safeguard that delivers the same results should be implemented. In the absence of both, you should document and justify why no action has been taken with regard to the safeguard.

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Best Practices for Minimizing the Impact of Social Engineering on Your Organization

Tuesday, June 26th, 2018

When many people think of cybercrime, they think of a bearded guy beating away at his keyboard in a dark room, searching for vulnerabilities in the network that can be exploited. While exploits are a big threat, the reality is that many attacks happen in smoother and more subtle ways. Why spend days slaving away to get in the backdoor, when you can just ask nicely to be let in through the front? This is the essence of social engineering.

social engineering impact

 

A social engineer uses a wide range of tactics to manipulate their victims into giving up whatever information they need. Imagine that someone with a police uniform knocks on your door and asks to have a word. They look authoritative, so you invite them in to sit down. They spend five minutes discussing crime in the neighborhood and on the way out, they secretly swipe the spare key. A few days later, you come back home to discover that all of your valuables are gone.

In this case, the social engineer tricked their way into the home by using the authority of the police uniform, which many people respect or even fear. Most people won’t think to turn down a police officer’s requests, or to ask for further identification. The attacker took advantage of this to gain access to the house, where they could get what they wanted, the spare key.

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Opt-In Email Encryption is Too Risky for HIPAA Compliance

Tuesday, July 11th, 2017

A majority of companies and hospitals that offer email encryption for HIPAA compliance allow senders to “opt in” to encryption on a message-by-message basis.  E.g., if the sender “does nothing special” then the email will be sent in the normal/insecure manner of email in general.  If the sender explicitly checks a box or adds some special content to the body or subject of the message, then it will be encrypted and HIPAA compliant.

Opt-in encryption is desirable because it is “easy” … end users don’t want any extra work and don’t want encryption requirements to bog them down, especially if many of their messages do not contain PHI.  It is “good for usability” and thus easy to sell.

Cybersecurity opt-in email encryption

However, opt-in encryption is a very bad idea with the inception of the HIPAA Omnibus rule.  Opt-in encryption imposes a large amount of risk on an organization, which grows exponentially with the size of the organization.  Organizations are responsible for the mistakes and lapses of their employees; providing an encryption system where inattention can lead to a breach is something to be very wary of.

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