" marketing Archives - LuxSci FYI Blog: Learn about HIPAA email encryption, secure email encryption, and more
LUXSCI

Posts Tagged ‘marketing’

Phishing or for Real? Why Companies Need to Take a Closer Look at Their Email Marketing

Friday, April 7th, 2017

 

In July 2016, Hilton HHonors loyalty program members received an email asking them to log into their Hilton HHonors account to confirm their correct email address, mailing address, and other personal details.

The email set off alarm bells for a number of customers. One tweeted a screenshot of the email to the Hilton HHonors Twitter account, asking, “… is this legit? Looks very much like a phishing email…”Phishing

Hilton’s support team responded, “This is not an email from the HHonors team. Please do not share your account details.”

The only problem? It was a legitimate email from Hilton HHonors, but it so closely resembled a phishing email it fooled Hilton’s own IT team.

Hilton is not the only company to inadvertently send customer emails that are nearly indistinguishable from phishing emails. Many companies send emails asking their customers to log in to confirm account information or confirm payment details. Sometimes, cautious customers will reach out to the digital community for feedback on whether an email is real or fake.

These emails are a problem because not only do customers believe them to be phishing emails, but they normalize emails that ask for personal information—making people more vulnerable to real phishing scams in the future.

Marketers need to understand email marketing best practices to send secure customer messages that don’t endanger customer privacy and data. Here’s everything you need to know from a technical and content perspective to make sure your email isn’t mistaken for a phishing scam.

Read the rest of this post »

What is HIPAA-compliant Email Marketing?

Monday, February 27th, 2017

To achieve HIPPA-compliant email marketing, you need to satisfy two objectives. First, you need to understand the fundamentals of email marketing. Second, you need to execute your email marketing activities within HIPPA’s requirements and restrictions.

HIPAA-compliant email marketing

It’s easy to make a mistake with HIPAA-compliant email marketing, especially when you’re in a rush.

Picture this:

You leave your clinic early on a Thursday afternoon to head off on a vacation. Before you go, you ask your office manager to send off an email blast. You were just certified on a new procedure and you know at least 200 patients in your files would likely benefit from it. A simple message inviting them to the office for a consultation next week is the perfect next step. Your office manager takes some quick notes and promises to send off the note tomorrow. And off you go for a weekend of golf at Pebble Beach.

On your way home, you check your email. You see an angry email from a patient and start reading. It turns out that you’ve violated some arcane HIPAA rules… Even worse, that patient’s sister is an attorney who has promised to call you tomorrow. You’re pretty sure you’ve done nothing wrong but you’re nervous on the flight home.

This situation could have been prevented if your office manager had asked you one simple question:

Read the rest of this post »

Is sharing my patient list with a marketing company OK under HIPAA?

Saturday, February 11th, 2017

We received this questions via Ask Erik from the head of a Dental Practice (who wished to remain anonymous):

“I want to create a Refer-a-Friend program, for a dental practice, that will be managed by a third party marketing agency.  The third party needs only my patient names and address to do an on-going e-mail campaign, no PHI will be given to the third party — just name and e-mail address.

Because I am ‘Marketing” to my own list, and I am NOT marketing any third party products, and I am not receiving any third party payment for anything:

* Am I in any HIPAA danger? (No PHI is ever exchanged, and I am NOT marketing anyone else’s product.)

* Because my PHI is de-identified from the associated names and e-mail addresses, is it OK for me to hand over my patient mail list to my marketing agency (being very careful of course to include NO PHI)?

* Does HIPAA specifically prevent me from marketing my own products to my patient list? I know that marketing other people’s products to my list will require prior consent. But, marketing my own Refer-a-Friend program… how is that a violation?

NOTE: PHI is defined as: “(A) is created or received by a health care provider, health plan, public health authority, employer, life insurer, school or university, or health care clearinghouse; and (B) relates to the past, present, or future physical or mental health or condition of any individual, the provision of health care to an individual, or the past, present, or future payment for the provision of health care to an individual.”

So, is a mail list of my patients’ names and e-mail addresses considered to be PHI (if it contains no associated PHI as defined above)? The definition above would say NO. The definition above states that it is ONLY the health information about a patient — NOT the patient’s name and e-mail addresses themselves.

Also, on the mail list for the Refer-a-Friend marketing program, there will be names other than patients, probably about 5% are not patients. Does this influence the phi/non-phi question?

This is a very important distinction. Having clarity on this question could free up a lot of us to proceed with e-mail marketing.

If a mailing list, for a dentist, that contains 95% patients and 5% non-patients, and NO health information (just names and addresses)… is it considered PHI?”

Read the rest of this post »

Why you should separate your business and your marketing email sending

Thursday, February 21st, 2013

A typical organization sends at least two very distinct classes of email messages: business email and marketing email.

Business email consists of all of the individual, personal messages sent by sales, support, billing and other departments to specific people.  These messages are generally more time sensitive; it is very important that the recipients actually receive them; these messages should not be filtered by any kind of spam filtering software, if possible.

Marketing email messages are similar messages sent in bulk to many people at once.  Examples of these include newsletters, notifications of blog updates, promotions and ads, status notices, etc.

In order for your business email to be as reliable as possible, the marketing email should be sent separately, through separate servers and maybe even on a separate domain name.  Here we will look at why.

Read the rest of this post »

LUXSCI